Hoist Information - Southern Mobility Centres
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Hoist Information

Overhead hoists are increasing in popularity. The hoist unit hangs from a track that is securely attached to the ceiling. The client is suspended in a sling from the hoist unit and moved along the length of the track. Although the over head can only be used where there is track it is particularly useful in places where it would be awkward to wheel a mobile. Track configurations can be anything from a straight run, through complex arrangements with bends and turn tables, to the XY system which allows complete coverage of a room, such as a hospital ward.

Attaching the Sling

An area of confusion is the fitting of the sling around the client and to the hoist. This is not rocket science and a little practice, first on yourself and then a colleague will serve you well.

An area of confusion is the fitting of the sling around the client and to the hoist. This is not rocket science and a little practice, first on yourself and then a colleague will serve you well.

Although slings vary, depending on the needs of the client, the principles of usage are similar. Perhaps the most versatile and comfortable slings are similar to the Oxford “Quick fit Deluxe” or “Chiltern Hammock”. This gives ample support for 95% of clients, aids toileting and used properly, is extremely secure.

The first step is to familiarise yourself with the sling. Make sure you know which way up and which way round (handles facing outwards) the sling goes. Look at the leg supports, note that the inner straps are short and on the inside the outer straps are long and on the outside.

Have a look at the commode aperture, (between the leg supports). Irrespective of where you are lifting from the top of this aperture needs to be at the base of the spine.

The sling needs to be drawn under the client and the leg supports drawn up between the thighs so that the inner leg straps can be held together.

To help connecting the straps to the spreader bar, think of the spreader bar as the waist when it is across the body line. Leg straps go below the waist, and shoulder straps above. The middle hook found on some hoists, corresponds to some slings which have intermediate straps.

To maximize safety for the client it is recommended that the inner leg straps are crossed before feeding the outer straps through the loops of the inner straps. This is easier than it sounds. Cross the inner leg straps by feeding one through the other. Next, take one of the outer leg straps and feed it through the crossed inner strap before connecting it to the corresponding hook on the spreader bar. Repeat this for the other leg.

Connect the shoulder straps to the corresponding hooks. To keep the client in an upright position during the lift, keep the shoulder straps short and the leg straps long. Although lifting a client in this position is preferable, there is a risk of a client tipping forward, so individual assessment is crucial.

TIP: check the sling loops are firmly secured before commencing lift.

Buying an overhead hoist

Please contact us for a free assessment.